Creating A City in A Garden

108 comments
Asia, Singapore
Singapore, A Garden City

Singapore, An Aspiring Green City

“From the beginning, even before Singapore became independent, we sought to build a world-class living environment here through greenery. At first we aimed to be a “Garden City” – parks, reservoirs, Kallang River cleaned up, Singapore River, later cleaned up… The next phase from being a “Garden City” is to make ourselves into a “City in a Garden”. It is a play on words, but it means something different, because it means connecting our communities and our places and spaces through parks, gardens, streetscapes and skyrise greenery.”

Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore Prime Minister

Singapore’s current Prime Minister delivered a clear message of his aspiration to make the small country an even better place to live in, built on the very foundation his father – the late founding father of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew – had laid, upon which the nation propelled itself from a mere colonial trading port into a rich country whose influence transcends its geographical boundaries.

Home to more than 3,000 hectares of nature reserves, more than half of Singapore’s main island today is covered in green, a significant increase from only a third of the island’s area three decades ago. And that happened to a city-state whose population almost doubled in the same period of time.

Singapore’s vision to be a garden city was conceived by Lee Kuan Yew himself three years after the nation’s reluctant independence from Malaysia, an event Mr. Lee fervently tried to prevent for he believed the Merger with Malaysia was the right thing for the tiny city-state. But had Singapore not been expelled from the union with its neighbor to the north, the story would have been much different today.

Surrounding, and inside, the city’s downtown are numerous parks providing not only shelter and convenient jogging tracks, but also open air museums, home to some of the most significant historical sites on the island. Fort Canning Hill, once known as Bukit Larangan – forbidden hill in Malay – for its strictly royal-family-only premises, sits right at the heart of Singapore’s business and shopping districts.

Excavation works uncovered precious artifacts buried on the hill, believed to be those of Malacca Sultanate’s. The artifacts now find a new home at the National Museum of Singapore, but one relic from the time of the sultanate still baffles historians today: the tomb of Sultan Iskandar Shah, the last king of Singapura before the Java-based kingdom of Majapahit took the island by storm. Today a lone tomb, resting at a shaded pavilion under tall, old trees bears the marking ‘Keramat Sultan Iskandar Shah’, or the tomb of Sultan Iskandar Shah, in spite of theories that he was buried either in Malacca or near Port Dickson, both in Peninsular Malaysia.

When Stamford Raffles came to Singapore in the early 19th century, he commissioned the construction of the British governor’s residence as well as the island’s first botanical garden on the hill – no other nation, it seems, is as passionate as the British when it comes to botanical gardens. In the following decades a fort was built in response to the perceived growing threat to the British colonial rule on the island. The park now protects what is left from the time the European power gripped a full control of the island.

The Tomb of Sultan Iskandar Shah, the Ruler of ...

A Faux Tomb of Sultan Iskandar Shah, the Ruler of Singapura in the 14th Century

A Pathway at Fort Canning Hill

A Leafy Pathway at Fort Canning Hill

An Old Lighthouse at Fort Canning Hill

Fort Canning Hill’s Old Lighthouse

However there is no other garden in the city which can quite measure up to the sheer size of the modern architecture wonder that is Gardens by the Bay.

Constructed over a 101-hectare piece of land to the south of Singapore’s iconic waterfront at Marina Bay, the $829 million artificial gardens become the nation’s most prominent icon for its aspiration to become truly a city in a garden. Designed by an international architecture firm, two massive columnless glass conservatories are the highlights of the mega-project. Dubbed the Flower Dome and the Cloud Forest, each replicates the warm and dry Mediterranean climate and the cool and humid tropical montane forest respectively.

As James and I stepped inside the Cloud Forest, an impressive wall covered in lush green vegetation and colorful blossoms towered under the arched curves of the glass dome. Acting like a curtain were the awe-inspiring waterfalls coming down from multiple levels of the artificial wall, or ‘mountain’. The cool air, and the minuscule droplets from the waterfalls, brushed against my face, a refreshing break from the tropical heat and humidity outside.

The multi-tiered mountain hosts different display themes, from replicas of stalagmites to walkways around a wall festooned with wild orchids and a plethora of other colors. A glance out through the glass, Singapore’s skyscrapers rose above the river under the midday sun. Impressive was an understatement.

As we walked through the last hanging walkway before descending to the bottom of the artificial forest, mist started wafting from the bridge’s sides, bringing moisture to the air to keep the plants green and alive.

At the forest’s floor, I couldn’t help looking up towards the 42 m mountain – a bizarre yet astounding centerpiece of the glass-encapsulated man-made wonder.

Artificial Waterfalls at the Cloud Forest

Artificial Waterfalls at the Cloud Forest, Gardens by the Bay

Inside the Cloud Forest

Inside the Cloud Forest

An Engineering Marvel

An Engineering Marvel

A Decorative Sculpture from Timor-Leste

A Decorative Sculpture from Timor-Leste

More East Timorese Sculptures

More East Timorese Sculptures among the Plants

Quirkiness Inside the Dome

Humor in the Man-made Environment

Colorful Blooms

Colorful Blossoms

Pitcher Plant (check)

Nepenthes, the Tropical Pitcher Plant

Plant

North American Pitcher Plants

Flower 5

Violet Moth Orchid

Walking the ....

Aerial Walkways

Encircling the ...

A Wall of Montane Forest

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Replicas of Stalagmites

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Maintaining Moisture inside the Dome

As though the conservatories were not mind-blowing enough, there was the Supertree Grove – a group of giant tree-like structures covered in vines and flowers – measuring between 25 m to 50 m in height. As the night fell, lights in a myriad of colors painted the colossal trees, bringing the magical landscape of Pandora from James Cameron’s Avatar to life.

Set against the pretentious backdrop that is Marina Bay Sands, Supertree Grove not only is Singapore’s spirit of kiasuism at display, but also a manifestation of the tiny nation’s dream and ambition to inspire. Photovoltaic panels atop the trees provide power to light up the structures when night falls; cleverly-designed tree canopies collect rainwater for irrigation within the gardens; their overall gigantic size acts as the conservatories’ cooling system. Any Na’vi would certainly be proud of these environmentally-friendly structures.

However I didn’t hear anyone speaking Na’vi that night, nor did I see any ikrans scouring the overcast sky, the Hallelujah Mountains, too, were nonexistent. Only the evocative tunes of a great light and sound performance, a rhapsody of crimson, turquoise, teal, and violet, under the grey skies at eventide. An overture to the the majestic gardens’ lullaby, an engineering feat made to dream and inspire.

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Supertree Grove at Night

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An Avataresque Scene

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Purple Supertree Against Cloudy Night Sky

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Hanging Walkway, 22 m above the Ground

....

Imagination Brought to Life

....

A Crimson Rhapsody

Posted by

Based in Jakarta, always curious about the world, always fascinated by ancient temples, easily pleased by food.

108 thoughts on “Creating A City in A Garden”

    • Despite his authoritarian style, he managed to bring prosperity to Singapore. Truly an exceptional person he was.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Ellie. Singapore can be very interesting to explore, only if you go to the ‘right’ places. Apart from this ultramodern man-made wonder, it has charming ethnic neighborhoods and well-preserved colonial gems.

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  1. Bama, reading this I honestly wished that Hong Kong had the same foresight – our greening efforts came much too late and the streets here are far less pleasant to walk on than those in Singapore. It’s tough to pick a favourite photo from this stunning collection. That said, I do love the closeups of those flowers in the Cloud Forest and your shots from the Supertree Grove.

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    • Honestly I prefer navigating my way through HK’s streets. Sure, Singapore has clean, wide streets and boulevards, but for me that actually makes walking around the city more exhausting. It’s comparable with walking in Vienna vs in Paris. 🙂
      However Singapore’s effort to make the city a very green place is really something other cities in the region should learn. As for Jakarta, only less than 10 percent of its area is covered in green space, far from the 30 percent figure required by regulation. Anyway, thank you, James!

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  2. dulu ngga pernah ada niat mengunjungi singapura, konon spot wisatanya artificial semua. tapi seharusnya kita belajar banyak dari mereka. negara kecil yang ngga punya apa2 itu berusaha keras menjadi sesuatu

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    • Betul. Tiap negara pasti punya kelebihan dan kekurangan. Indonesia punya kelebihan (bahkan bisa dibilang kelimpahan) alam yang indah, tapi sayang kesadaran masyarakatnya masih sangat memprihatinkan. Sebaliknya Singapura wilayahnya sangat kecil dibandingkan Indonesia, tapi kesadaran dan kemauan masyarakatnya untuk memiliki lebih banyak ruang terbuka hijau sangat tinggi. Selain itu didukung juga dengan regulasi yang dijalankan dengan konsekuen.

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    • Thank you, Amrit. Hopefully all my posts on Singapore give you a better idea of what the small country has to offer. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Absolutely. I am definitely going to have a look at all of them. 🙂
    You are a wonderful photographer.

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    • Apart from Gardens by the Bay, I personally find Singapore’s ethnic and Peranakan neighborhoods very charming.

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    • It was quite surreal entering an ultramodern dome to find such waterfalls. I wonder if one day Singapore finds a way to create artificial hill or even mountain. 🙂

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  4. Thanks Bama, great post! I was in Singapore 4 years ago, a quick stop on my way to Indonesia and Malaysia. I had the time to visit the Botanical gardens which i loved, still so different!😄 Never heard of these gardens during my stay, such a pity. Now there is one good reason to come back to Singapore, I would like it so much. I think every European loves your city!

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    • Merci! Gardens by the Bay was opened in 2012, so maybe four years ago there was not so much fanfare about this megaproject. Singapore is a convenient place for a stopover to Indonesia and Malaysia, but the small island itself has a fair share of interesting places to explore. My personal favorite is the ethnic-based neighborhoods and beautiful British colonial buildings.

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      • Yes, I think I visited in 2011. Personally, I loved the Indian and Chinese districts and I might sound a bit posh, but I liked the architecture of the Raffles Hotel so much! (and the cocktails too!)

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      • Oh how I loved both neighborhoods! Also the Raffles Hotel, although I didn’t go in. 🙂

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  5. Nice words as usual, Bama. I love the way you describe about it, very intrigue, arouse the curiosity but fascinating as well, including “however I didn’t hear anyone speaking Na’vi that night, nor did I see any ikrans scouring the overcast sky, the Hallelujah Mountains, too, were nonexistent”, haha.. Too imaginative 😛

    Singapore, GBTB, Flower Dome, Cloud Forest, and everything in it still keep enchanting my eyes, especially The Tulipmania’s event. It’s one of my bucket list, and I was so happy for it.
    In my humble opinion, our country should learn ( a lot ) from Singapore. I’m not talking about the act of “kiasu”, it’s more about the way of Singaporean in keeping, protecting, and maintaining the assets as “the part of themselves”. However, altough it’s hard to admit, but we still lack of it.

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    • Haha, well.. I was really impressed with James Cameron’s movie and when I was sitting underneath those supertrees I couldn’t help to compare the whimsical structures with the landscapes on Pandora in the movie.

      I couldn’t agree more about how much we can learn from Singapore. After visiting Gardens by the Bay I was thinking how nice it would have been if Jakarta had such garden. But we still have so much homework to do — the MRT completion is one of the main priorities.

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      • I was really impressed with the movie too as well as I was impressed with the supertrees, but I didn’t have the imaginative mind as yours 😀
        Should be impress with your article too.
        Well, government is doing the MRT’s project and we will have it later.
        The main point here is about keeping and maintaning those facilities. I think we still need to learn more about that.

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      • Haha, oh well.. 😀
        As you said, building infrastructure is one thing. But maintaining them is another issue, and we’re not known for our proper maintenance. It should change if we really want to live a better life.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Hi Bama – thank you for this amazing post and great pictures. I have always wanted to see a carnivorous plant in action. Did you see any of the flowers catching something or having a ‘belly full’?
    – Ruta

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    • Hi Ruta. Unfortunately the only living things inside the dome when I went were the plants themselves and human visitors. I wonder, though, if the staff feed those pitcher plants real insects.

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  7. Love the photos here, and it shows the strength of Singapore ~ the feeling of nature and beauty that I have not seen in any other city in Asia. It is one of the great things that makes Singapore special.

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    • Singapore shows that economic progress doesn’t always mean destruction to nature. They can go hand in hand, only if planned and managed properly. Thanks Randall.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Bama I am astounded! Do you suppose there is another city in the world that has dedicated this type of money and energy into such gardens and green space? Your photos are incredible as always.

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    • I haven’t done my research, but it’s really hard to match what Singapore has done regarding to its green space. It’s inspirational to say the least. Thank you, Sue.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Absolutely beautiful – and I especially loved the historical description alongside. Amazing to see how a conceived idea was then really brought to life. How extraordinary!

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  10. Lihat gambarnya Garden of the bay, ini Singapore memang gila kerennya. Rasanya nggak ada mati ide-ide yang membuat kotanya semakin dikenal dunia. 😀
    By the way, nisan Sultan Iskandar Shah-nya masih tersimpan di National Museum of Singapore atau gimana, Bama?

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    • Ya begitulah kalau negara ekonominya maju tapi korupsinya sangat rendah. Akhirnya banyak dana yang bisa dimanfaatkan untuk kepentingan publik juga.
      Menurut penelitian sih Sultan Iskandar Shah, yang nama aslinya adalah Parameswara, dimakamkan di Malaysia.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I’ve been to Singapore a couple of times now (for concerts and food) but for my next visit, I’m planning to do a day hike along the Southern Ridges on the west coast of the island. The trail is about 10 km long & it will take you to some amazing scenery of Singapore.

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    • Is it where they have those limestone hills? You remind me of a friend of mine who went to Singapore quite frequently to watch different kinds of concert. He even slept on a park bench once because he couldn’t get a room to spend the night. 😀

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    • Even with all the natural beauty I have at home, I myself was very impressed with what Singapore had done to pursue its vision.

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  12. Dan Thunder says:

    I am so impressed with all of these 🙂 I have no idea how beautiful Signapure is 🙂

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    • Singapore doesn’t have jaw-dropping natural landscapes, nor impressive ancient sites to begin with. But maybe that’s the reason why the country has been doing well in preserving its colonial heritage as well as creating new inspiring attractions like Gardens by the Bay. Today it inspires other countries in the region, despite its size.

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  13. I love walking along the Singapore River in the afternoon, enjoying the clear water and green, clean riverside, while many Singaporeans are doing their jogging routine. Chinese Gardens is also my favorite. It’s quiet, green, and cozy place. I can spend hours or even a day there!

    Seeing those flowers and plants, it’s hard to believe that they’re located inside a man-made garden. And the pictures of the Super Tree make my fantasy flies. Great shots! 🙂

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    • I can see why you love it, Nug. Singapore’s orderliness is one of the things that keep Indonesians coming back to the country, to escape chaotic traffic back home. 😀

      Thank you, Nugie. I myself was pleasantly surprised by those artificial trees, even more so after I learned about its sustainability.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Hi Bama, your night shots are stunning! You gave justice to the magnificence of the Gardens by the Bay. Truly hats off to the leaders of Singapore for great aesthetic visions for their country state.

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    • Thank you, Marisol. It was really hard to take decent photos of the trees at first as I didn’t bring my tripod; most of my photos are blurry. 😀
      Singapore’s low corruption, high human development index, and visionary leaders are perfect combination to creating such an advanced economy and society.

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  15. Seumur-umur baru jalan ke Singapore sekali, dan gak terpikir untuk kembali kesana, karena terlalu banyak hal yang artificial. Tapi seandainya kesana lagi, maka Garden by the Bay ini bakal jadi spot wajib, dibandingkan hal-hal semacam Universal Studio dll.

    Aku rasa ini salah satu pengingat penting untuk kita orang-orang Indonesia, yang gak perlu bersusah payah untuk mempunyai kawasan hijau yang alami. Dan saat ini masalah terbesar kita adalah, menjaganya.

    Secara pribadi, aku berharap pemimpin negara kita mempunyai visi yang jelas, terucapkan dan terlaksanakan untuk menjaga lingkungan di seluruh kawasan Indonesia, sejelas visi pemimpin-pemimpin Singapore di atas. Jangan sampai telat menunggu sampai rusak parah.

    Btw, ini artikel yang informatif dan foto-foto yang menarik Bam, kusukaaa! 🙂

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    • Mungkin kalo kamu ke Singapura lagi bisa coba explore daerah Pecinan/Little India/Peranakannya, Bart. Bangunan-bangunan tuanya relatif terawat, dan banyak makanan enak, terutama di daerah Peranakan di Joo Chiat.

      Waktu aku ke Gardens by the Bay yang aku pikirkan adalah betapa kita tuh punya garden alami yang selalu kita bangga-banggakan, tapi masih banyak yang belum tau (atau belum mau tau) cara untuk menjaganya. Suatu tempat wisata kalau sudah mulai terkenal di kalangan wisatawan Indonesia biasanya, dan sedihnya, akan diikuti dengan ceceran sampah di sana-sini.

      Makasih, Bart. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Little India dan Chinatown nya sudah Bam, waktu pertama kali itu. Hmmm aku pernah baca soal daerah yang menyediakan kuliner Peranakan, dan tertarik juga untuk kapan-kapan mengeksplor nya, tapi aku lupa namanya. Mungkin yang kamu sebut di atas ya? Thanks info tambahannya.

        Setuju banget Bam, salah satu masalah wisata alam di Indonesia adalah seperti itu. Ketika menjadi popular, maka selanjutnya akan dihadapkan pada masalah kurang baiknya manajemen wisatawan yang datang, baik dari segi jumlah, attitude maupun hasil samping seperti sampah dll. Kasus paling jelas adalah: Gunung Semeru, paska meledaknya novel dan film 5 cm.

        Aku jadi teringat satu tempat di Bogor, namanya Curug Luhur di Gunung Salak. Di tahun 96/97, aku pernah camping di situ. Curugnya bagus. Airnya melimpah, dengan kolam utama alami yang besar, dan kolam-kolam alami kecil lainnya di sepanjang alirannya. Di tahun 2009 aku datang ke curug itu lagi. Dan kondisinya sangat menyedihkan. Curugnya sudah tidak terlihat, karena -entah atas ide siapa- dibangunlah kolam-kolam buatan yang ala ala waterboom dengan desain yang seadanya, dan mengambil aliran utama curug sebagai sumber utama airnya. Sedih, karena gak bisa lihat lagi curug di tengah hutan itu lagi. Yang ada cuma kolam-kolam buatan bertingkat-tingkat, dan sampah dimana-mana :-((

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      • Kalo memang ada rencana mau ke Joo Chiat please let me know. Di sana kamu bisa nyobain laksa seafood yang enak banget (bahkan Gordon Ramsay gak bisa ngalahin buatan owner tempat laksa itu), ada juga ayam keluak, dll. Di salah satu restoran bahkan musik yang diputar adalah keroncong, jadi ada Sundari Soekotjo, dll. 🙂

        Sekarang untungnya sudah semakin banyak sarana bagi masyarakat maupun akademisi untuk menyuarakan concernnya. Beberapa waktu yang lalu aku sempat baca ada wacana untuk membangun waterboom di dekat kompleks percandian Muaro Jambi. Kan kelihatan banget orientasinya hanya uang semata, padahal jika candi-candinya sendiri dinomorduakan justru akan tidak sustainable di masa datang. Edukasi itu PR yang sangat sangat sangat besar bagi Indonesia, dan transparansi tentunya.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sure, you will be my friendly-reference 🙂
        Apalagi kalau sudah menyangkut masalah jajanan dan panganan hahaha ….

        Wah aku baru dengar soal itu, padahal daripada dibangun waterboom, lebih baik dananya digunakan untuk mengekskavasi kompleks Candi Muaro Jambi itu, yang konon 5 lebih besar daripada kompleks Angkor Wat, dan 21 kali lebih besar daripada Borobudur. Tapi mungkin dari segi bisnis ini gak termasuk “seksi” ya ….

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  16. Every time we leave for Indonesia from Germany, we take the transit route in Singapore, but we never really plan on stopping by for some days. Having read your post, I might consider staying in Singapore for some days before heading to Surabaya. Love it!

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    • Hi Lulu. Singapore can be an interesting place to explore for non-shoppers, only if you know where to go. I particularly enjoyed Gardens by the Bay and the city’s ethnic neighborhoods.

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    • It really was an idea conceived from creativity, environmental awareness, as well as craziness — I mean, who would’ve thought that making an indoor forest was possible? 🙂

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  17. Singapore is a great place with so much to do. The Botanic gardens and the children’s garden there is also fabulous. Such a great place 🙂

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    • I agree. Although it would be better to put its Chinese, Indian, Malay, and Peranakan heritage on the spotlight as well, alongside that ultramodern image Singapore is trying to promote.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Recently I read that another project is under way in Singapore to impress the world: Changi’s new terminal. The city constantly builds megastructures not only to showcase its economic prowess, but also to sustain its long-term development goals.

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  18. Pingback: Creating A City in A Garden | habibigarden

  19. Singapore was crossed off my list when i was told it is always hot. There’s gotta be a warm period if it is mostly hot. Thanks for making me rethink 😉

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    • Singapore is hot and humid. That’s why many tourists who visit the island go the malls to escape the heat. However the Cloud Forest is a good alternative if you don’t want to worry about being tempted to spend your money to shop. 🙂 Thanks for reading!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Bama, your piece reminds me how much more we have yet to see in Singapore! I appreciate the mix of brilliant engineering, culture, and quirkiness inside the Cloud Forest. And the Supertree is reminiscent of the Tree of Life at the 2015 Expo in Milan, Italy.

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    • Singapore is very small, but it can be quite interesting. The Cloud Forest is one of my favorite places in the city, partly because it provides a good escape from the heat. 🙂
      Ahh, I didn’t know about the Tree of Life in Milan Expo. Will check that out later. Thanks Tricia!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hopefully by the time you arrive in Singapore the haze will have already gone. Otherwise the Cloud Forest in Gardens by the Bay is a nice place to seek clean air, I suppose.

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  21. Waw :DKeren banget fotonya.. sumpah asik banget.. semoga saya bisa menyusul mengunjungi tempat keren ini 😀 hehe

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    • Terima kasih atas komentarnya, Annas. Semoga sempat ke Gardens by the Bay ketika berkunjung ke Singapura suatu saat nanti.

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  22. Pingback: Creating A City in A Garden | Hanna Sapinoso

    • They really are. Everything they create seems to always sell. But of course the product is usually of top-notch quality.

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    • Hi Sreejith! You’re welcome. Hope you have a really great time in Singapore! and I’m glad this post helps you plan your trip.

      Like

  23. kemaren iseng-iseng weekend getaway ke Singapura dan salah besar hahahaha…. pas F1 soalnya! semua serba mahal dan brisik wkwkwk… tetapi visit ke Garden by the bay-nya memang luarbiasa sampai bikin kaki capek banget nget nget (mau putus rasanya!) Di penampilan supertree-nya sempat denger Bengawan Solo….!
    Pas pulang dari supertree, sangking kaki pegel mau istirahat sebentar, pas melangkah ke tempat duduk….yiiiksss… ada tikus kayaknya kaget juga (saya kaget dia kaget 😀 :D: D) lalu dia lari juga ke semak-semak. Saya juga ga jadi berenti hahaha… Padahal cukup banyak pengunjung lho… Sangkain tikus cuma ada di Indonesia 😀 😀 😀

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    • Jalan-jalan di sekitar area sirkuit banyak yang ditutup juga kah mbak? Btw Bengawan Solo itu sepertinya salah satu lagu Indonesia yang banyak disukasi di luar negeri lho, dari Jepang sampai Kamboja, Singapura, dan beberapa negara lainnya. Wah ada tikus di Supertree? Yah, rocker juga manusia… Si tikus melihat Supertree sama kayak dia melihat hutan kali ya, hehe..

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      • Akses ke sirkuit asli ga bisa dimasuki even jalan kaki kecuali ada tiket utk F1. Hotel sekitar sirkuit mahal bgt. Resto dan public space dg view ke sirkuit ditutup atau dijual mahal. Coba itu? Pokoknya semua support abis2an deh buat F1. Sy hanya kebagian jendela sempit di museum art itupun nyuri2 kesempatan kalo petugasnya lengah hahaha… tp jauh jaraknya juga…
        Blur juga hasilnya hahaha…
        Soal tikus, masa cuma manusia aja yang enjoy di garden by the bay? 😀

        Liked by 1 person

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